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South Korea's young men are fighting against feminism
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 01:31:54 GMT
On the same street corner in Seoul where 10,000 South Korean women rallied last October to demand an end to spy cameras and sexual violence, the leader of a new activist group addressed a small group of angry young men.
Dozens injured in Albania earthquake
Sat, 21 Sep 2019 20:37:55 GMT
At least 37 people were injured on Saturday when a 5.6-magnitude earthquake struck Albania.
The UK is gearing up for its dirtiest election ever
Sat, 21 Sep 2019 08:48:23 GMT
Boris Johnson has been backed into a corner over Brexit. Partly through his own missteps, partly from the growing opposition to his "do-or-die" Brexit plan, Johnson is a man for whom the losses are piling up, while the UK is a country running out of time.
Petrol bombs, tear gas used in Hong Kong protests
Sat, 21 Sep 2019 15:44:58 GMT
CNN's Will Ripley reports from Hong Kong, where protests continue for the 16th straight weekend.
Harry and Meghan fly among us -- but you'd never know
Sat, 21 Sep 2019 14:15:12 GMT
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have committed to flying commercial for their upcoming visit to southern Africa, having faced criticism for their use of private jets for their summer vacations.
Ikea wants to build homes in Britain that cost what the buyer can pay
Wed, 26 Jun 2019 15:57:04 GMT
Ikea conquered the world with inexpensive furniture. Now it's turning its attention to affordable homes in Britain.
This startup helps you find any place on the planet without an address
Tue, 27 Aug 2019 13:43:46 GMT
Traditional addresses don't work.
Uber's flying taxis are heading to Melbourne
Wed, 12 Jun 2019 09:04:47 GMT
Uber has picked Melbourne as the first city outside the United States to debut its flying taxis.
Check out Porsche's first electric car
Thu, 05 Sep 2019 11:01:14 GMT
Porsche unveiled its first electric car, called the Taycan, on Wednesday. The car was introduced in two high-performance versions, the 670 horsepower Taycan Turbo and the 751 horsepower Taycan Turbo S.
US cities are losing 36 million trees a year. Here's why it matters
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:44:32 GMT
If you're looking for a reason to care about tree loss, the nation's latest heat wave might be it. Trees can lower summer daytime temperatures by as much as 10 degrees Fahrenheit, according to a recent study.
Miami's Little Haiti wasn't a target for developers. Until the seas started to rise
Fri, 12 Jul 2019 15:14:00 GMT
How rich people could help save the planet from the climate crisis
Fri, 12 Jul 2019 09:20:40 GMT
Rich people don't just have bigger bank balances and more lavish lifestyles than the rest of us -- they also have bigger carbon footprints.
These popular logos are all hiding a secret
Tue, 13 Mar 2018 02:21:53 GMT
'World's first' 360-degree infinity pool
Fri, 07 Jun 2019 01:46:07 GMT
The most dramatic fashion show of the year?
Wed, 18 Sep 2019 13:18:05 GMT
Model's skin tone made her a social media star
Thu, 31 Jan 2019 11:02:36 GMT
Where twins are worshiped -- and murdered
Thu, 31 Jan 2019 10:46:21 GMT
Why did this legendary car vanish for 30 years?
Tue, 23 Jul 2019 14:10:54 GMT
Comedy wildlife photos show animals at their funniest
Fri, 13 Sep 2019 20:10:27 GMT
There are some joke tellers that only a few people find funny, but a true comedy genius will have the whole world laughing.
The world's 50 best foods
Wed, 14 Mar 2018 20:01:07 GMT
"There is no love sincerer than the love of food," George Bernard Shaw said. Judging by the number of amazing dishes out there, he was right.
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Iran vows to lead Gulf security, as US sends more troops
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 04:14:22 -0400
Iran vows to lead Gulf security, as US sends more troopsIran's president said Sunday his country should lead regional security in the strategic Persian Gulf and warned against the presence of foreign forces, as the country's nuclear deal with world powers collapses and the U.S. deployed more troops to boost security for its Arab allies. The U.S. has said Iran is behind a series of attacks on the region's energy infrastructure, including a major drone-and-missile hit on Saudi Arabia's oil industry that shook global energy markets.
Labour's Corbyn Pledges EU Referendum by June: Brexit Update
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 04:31:41 -0400
Labour's Corbyn Pledges EU Referendum by June: Brexit Update(Bloomberg) -- Jeremy Corbyn, leader of the U.K.’s opposition Labour Party, said his party would hold a second referendum on Brexit by June if it wins a majority in a general election this year. European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said there will need to be a hard border in Ireland if the U.K. leaves the bloc without a deal.Key Developments:Juncker says the European Union must protect its single market and is not responsible for the consequences of a no-deal splitCorbyn says Labour would hold a referendum by June Johnson travels to New York later Sunday for UN General Assembly and talks with EU leadersAttempt to oust Labour Deputy Leader Tom Watson failedCorbyn Says Would Serve Full Term as PM (9:25 a.m.)Jeremy Corbyn said he would serve a full five-year term if wins a general election as leader of the Labour Party.There has been speculation that Corbyn, who is 70, wants to stand down as leader, but he told BBC TV that he is enjoying the job and doesn’t plan to do so.“I’m taking the party into the general election,” he said. When asked if he would serve a full term, he said “of course, why wouldn’t I?"Juncker: Ireland Will Need Border If No Deal (8:35 a.m.)European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker said there will have to be a hard border between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland if the U.K. leaves the EU without a deal.“We have to make sure that the interests of the European Union and of the internal market will be preserved,” Juncker said in a pre-recorded interview with Sky News. “An animal entering Northern Ireland without border control can enter without any kind of control the European Union via the southern part of the Irish island. This will not happen. We have to preserve the health and the safety of our citizens.”The EU doesn’t want a hard border and the border backstop is an important guarantee for the EU that will help preserve peace in Ireland, Juncker said. “The situation in Ireland has improved. We should not play with this,” he said. “Sometimes I have to question that some people are forgetting about the history.”He was clear that if a border does have to be constructed, the U.K. is to blame. “The EU is in no way responsible for any kind of consequences entailed by the Brexit,” he said. “That’s a British decision, a sovereign decision that we are respecting.”Gove Warns Against Repeat Referendum (Earlier)Michael Gove, the minister responsible for no-deal Brexit planning, warned against a second Brexit referendum, saying it would lead to a bitter rift between the public and Parliament.He said he is “profoundly concerned” about the prospect of a repeat plebiscite. “A second referendum would trigger deep popular anger and result in a tumultuous rejection of Parliament’s attempt to annul the first vote,” he write in an article for the Sunday Times.Gove also warned that the Conservative Party will suffer at the polls if it fails to deliver Brexit on Oct. 31. “We are on the razor’s edge of peril,” he wrote.Referendum by June, Corbyn Says (Earlier)Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said that if his party wins a general election there will be a referendum within six months after he as negotiated a swift Brexit deal with the European Union.Remain will be the other option in the vote, he told the Sunday Mirror in an interview, in line with a draft statement produced by the party’s National Executive Committee on Saturday.“My job is to ensure we are to make the offer to the British people between leave with a trading arrangement with Europe which protects jobs or remain and hopefully reform,” Corbyn . “I’ll let you know at the time,” he said when asked which way he would vote. he would see himself as the “referee” between the Brexit factions, he said.Earlier:Labour Party Backs Away From Civil War as Conference Starts (1)Brexit Stirs British Class War as Corbyn’s Troops Target EtonTo contact the reporter on this story: Thomas Penny in London at tpenny@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Tim Ross at tross54@bloomberg.net, Stuart BiggsFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Iran accuses foreign forces of raising Gulf 'insecurity'
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 03:35:47 -0400
Iran accuses foreign forces of raising Gulf 'insecurity'President Hassan Rouhani on Sunday denounced the presence of foreign forces in the Gulf and said Iran will proffer a peace plan, after arch-foe the United States ordered reinforcements to the tinderbox region. "Foreign forces can cause problems and insecurity for our people and for our region," Rouhani said in a televised speech at an annual military parade. Rouhani also said Iran would present a peace plan to the United Nations in the coming days.
From IS camp, Syrian family returns home to a hostile city
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 03:17:26 -0400
From IS camp, Syrian family returns home to a hostile cityAfter two years on the run with the Islamic State group, Um Mahmoud just wanted to return home. When she finally made it to Raqqa with her daughters and grandchildren, she found her home partially burned but livable. The 53-year-old seamstress had returned from al-Hol camp, where 73,000 people, most of them families of IS militants, have been kept since the territorial defeat of the group in March.
Saudi Arabia says if attack launched from Iran, it would be an act of war -CNN
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 02:45:17 -0400
Saudi Arabia says if attack launched from Iran, it would be an act of war -CNNIf an investigation shows that last week's attack on Saudi Arabian oil facilities was launched from Iranian territory, the kingdom would consider it an act of war, but Riyadh is currently seeking a peaceful resolution, a senior Saudi official said. "We hold Iran responsible because the missiles and the drones that were fired at Saudi Arabia...were Iranian-built and Iranian-delivered," Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Adel al-Jubeir told CNN late on Saturday. Jubeir told reporters earlier that Riyadh was awaiting the results of a probe, which it has invited international investigators to join, into the Sept. 14 strikes which initially halved Saudi production, the largest-ever assault on oil facilities in the world's top oil exporter.
Foreign forces raise Gulf 'insecurity': Iran's Rouhani
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 02:01:42 -0400
Foreign forces raise Gulf 'insecurity': Iran's RouhaniIran's President Hassan Rouhani said on Sunday that the presence of foreign forces creates "insecurity" in the Gulf, after the US ordered the deployment of more troops to the region. "Foreign forces can cause problems and insecurity for our people and for our region," Rouhani said in a televised speech at an annual military parade, adding that Iran would present to the UN a regional cooperation plan for peace.
The World's Oil Security Blanket Has Been Torched
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 02:00:19 -0400
The World's Oil Security Blanket Has Been Torched(Bloomberg Opinion) -- The real impact of the attack on Saudi oil installations last weekend goes well beyond the temporary loss of 5% of global oil production: It strikes at the heart of the mechanism that’s guaranteed the security of the world’s crude supply for most of the past 50 years.Ever since the western oil majors lost control of output in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia’s willingness to maintain idle production capacity has been the world’s safety valve to offset its dependence on the volatile region. When there was conflict and blockages elsewhere, Riyadh could always turn on the taps and serve the international market. But its new vulnerability requires a complete rethink of how we view and perhaps pay for the future security of supplies.Some 25 pilotless aircraft and cruise missiles of Iranian origin were used to strike the two sites, the Saudi Defense Ministry said at a press briefing four days after the attacks. The extent of Iran’s involvement remains unclear. It may have taken a direct role or it may have supplied the Houthi rebels in Yemen with hardware. That second possibility is almost more troubling because it puts the power to wreak havoc into the hands of anybody able to fly a drone. If the attack was indeed launched from Iran, that raises very serious questions about the ability of Saudi Arabia’s expensive air defense systems (or the people using them) to defend the most important oil installation on the planet. The failure to detect 25 incoming threats travelling 280 miles from the direction of your sworn enemy would be a major failure. Missing them from an unexpected direction would be easier to understand, although no less devastating.The damage to infrastructure will be repaired. The Khurais field resumed 30% of its output within 24 hours, pumping about 360,000 barrels a day, and the Abqaiq plant was processing 2 million barrels a day by Tuesday, down from 4.5 million before the strikes. The kingdom’s production capacity will be restored to 11 million barrels a day by the end of the month and in full by the end of November, according to the new energy minister Abdulaziz bin Salman. Some independent analysts see it taking longer. Energy consultants FGE said the Saudi plans were  optimistic, while Rystad Energy said repairs at Abqaiq may only be completed “as we approach the end of the year.”The disruption will be offset initially by increased production from Saudi fields that don’t rely on Abqaiq or Khurais for processing, by drawing on the kingdom’s own reserves at home and overseas, and through increased production from other countries. Emergency stockpiles in oil-consuming countries may be tapped if necessary, although the International Energy Agency doesn’t believe they will be needed.But Saudi Arabia’s 12 million barrels a day of maximum sustainable capacity has just lost its effectiveness as the world’s hydrocarbon security blanket.Strategic stockpiles held by oil-consuming countries have only ever been a sticking plaster, designed to get us through a short supply interruption while Saudi Arabia boosts output. But last Saturday’s attack has, at a stroke, taken out much of that spare capacity along with current supplies.What the world needs now is an outbreak of peace, or at least “live and let live,” in the Middle East. Unfortunately that seems as unlikely as ever. Demonizing Iran or any other country won’t reduce tensions even if it’s a natural reaction to the strikes.In the absence of political calm, clearly there needs to be an extensive upgrade to the protection of key assets —  although that might not thwart a repeat attack.Holding all of the world’s spare production capacity in one place has always been a risk. A broader system of allocating and paying for an output buffer across different geographies may be desirable, even for the U.S., which remains a net importer of oil. With international institutions losing their luster, however, I don’t hold out much hope.To contact the author of this story: Julian Lee at jlee1627@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Julian Lee is an oil strategist for Bloomberg. Previously he worked as a senior analyst at the Centre for Global Energy Studies.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
The World's Oil Security Blanket Has Been Torched
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 02:00:19 -0400
The World's Oil Security Blanket Has Been Torched(Bloomberg Opinion) -- The real impact of the attack on Saudi oil installations last weekend goes well beyond the temporary loss of 5% of global oil production: It strikes at the heart of the mechanism that’s guaranteed the security of the world’s crude supply for most of the past 50 years.Ever since the western oil majors lost control of output in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia’s willingness to maintain idle production capacity has been the world’s safety valve to offset its dependence on the volatile region. When there was conflict and blockages elsewhere, Riyadh could always turn on the taps and serve the international market. But its new vulnerability requires a complete rethink of how we view and perhaps pay for the future security of supplies.Some 25 pilotless aircraft and cruise missiles of Iranian origin were used to strike the two sites, the Saudi Defense Ministry said at a press briefing four days after the attacks. The extent of Iran’s involvement remains unclear. It may have taken a direct role or it may have supplied the Houthi rebels in Yemen with hardware. That second possibility is almost more troubling because it puts the power to wreak havoc into the hands of anybody able to fly a drone. If the attack was indeed launched from Iran, that raises very serious questions about the ability of Saudi Arabia’s expensive air defense systems (or the people using them) to defend the most important oil installation on the planet. The failure to detect 25 incoming threats travelling 280 miles from the direction of your sworn enemy would be a major failure. Missing them from an unexpected direction would be easier to understand, although no less devastating.The damage to infrastructure will be repaired. The Khurais field resumed 30% of its output within 24 hours, pumping about 360,000 barrels a day, and the Abqaiq plant was processing 2 million barrels a day by Tuesday, down from 4.5 million before the strikes. The kingdom’s production capacity will be restored to 11 million barrels a day by the end of the month and in full by the end of November, according to the new energy minister Abdulaziz bin Salman. Some independent analysts see it taking longer. Energy consultants FGE said the Saudi plans were  optimistic, while Rystad Energy said repairs at Abqaiq may only be completed “as we approach the end of the year.”The disruption will be offset initially by increased production from Saudi fields that don’t rely on Abqaiq or Khurais for processing, by drawing on the kingdom’s own reserves at home and overseas, and through increased production from other countries. Emergency stockpiles in oil-consuming countries may be tapped if necessary, although the International Energy Agency doesn’t believe they will be needed.But Saudi Arabia’s 12 million barrels a day of maximum sustainable capacity has just lost its effectiveness as the world’s hydrocarbon security blanket.Strategic stockpiles held by oil-consuming countries have only ever been a sticking plaster, designed to get us through a short supply interruption while Saudi Arabia boosts output. But last Saturday’s attack has, at a stroke, taken out much of that spare capacity along with current supplies.What the world needs now is an outbreak of peace, or at least “live and let live,” in the Middle East. Unfortunately that seems as unlikely as ever. Demonizing Iran or any other country won’t reduce tensions even if it’s a natural reaction to the strikes.In the absence of political calm, clearly there needs to be an extensive upgrade to the protection of key assets —  although that might not thwart a repeat attack.Holding all of the world’s spare production capacity in one place has always been a risk. A broader system of allocating and paying for an output buffer across different geographies may be desirable, even for the U.S., which remains a net importer of oil. With international institutions losing their luster, however, I don’t hold out much hope.To contact the author of this story: Julian Lee at jlee1627@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: James Boxell at jboxell@bloomberg.netThis column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.Julian Lee is an oil strategist for Bloomberg. Previously he worked as a senior analyst at the Centre for Global Energy Studies.For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com/opinion©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Big companies commit to slash emissions ahead of U.N. climate summit
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 00:34:20 -0400
Big companies commit to slash emissions ahead of U.N. climate summitAlmost 90 big companies in sectors from food to cement to telecommunications are pledging to slash their greenhouse gas emissions in a new campaign to steer multi-nationals towards a low-carbon future, organizers said on Sunday. “Now we need many more companies to join the movement, sending a clear signal that markets are shifting,” U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said in a statement. The coalition was launched in June with a call to action by the United Nations, business and civil society leaders.
Big companies commit to slash emissions ahead of U.N. climate summit
Sun, 22 Sep 2019 00:00:01 -0400
Big companies commit to slash emissions ahead of U.N. climate summitAlmost 90 big companies in sectors from food to cement to telecommunications are pledging to slash their greenhouse gas emissions in a new campaign to steer multi-nationals towards a low-carbon future, organizers said on Sunday. “Now we need many more companies to join the movement, sending a clear signal that markets are shifting,” U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said in a statement. The coalition was launched in June with a call to action by the United Nations, business and civil society leaders.
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