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Muslim nations defend China as it cracks down on Muslims
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 08:21:35 GMT
Parts of South Asia are becoming unlivable
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:15:34 GMT
Almost six million people are under threat from rising flood waters across South Asia, where hundreds of thousands of people have already been displaced as a result of heavy monsoon rains.
Ariana Grande concert bomber's brother extradited
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 22:19:24 GMT
The brother of the suicide bomber who killed 22 people at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester in 2017 has been extradited from Libya to the United Kingdom, according to a Libyan official.
9,000-year-old settlement unearthed
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 14:35:54 GMT
A huge Stone Age settlement unearthed outside Jerusalem may have been home to 3,000 people, the Neolithic equivalent of a large city, according to details released by the Israel Antiquities Authority on Tuesday.
The islands more radioactive than Chernobyl
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 09:13:29 GMT
Radiation levels across parts of the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean, where the United States tested nuclear bombs during the Cold War, are higher than areas contaminated by the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear disasters, new research suggests.
Hyundai unveils India's most powerful electric car
Wed, 10 Jul 2019 13:42:10 GMT
Hyundai just unveiled India's most powerful electric car and plans to build a network to charge it too.
Sex toys will be officially sanctioned at CES after vibrator controversy
Tue, 16 Jul 2019 20:36:49 GMT
Following allegations of sexism and gender bias, the Consumer Technology Association said Tuesday it would officially sanction sex tech companies, allowing them to show their products at next year's Consumer Electronics Show.
The billion-dollar Indian startup built on green energy
Mon, 15 Jul 2019 10:37:30 GMT
Indian startup ReNew Power has raised more than $1 billion in funds this year alone for its wind and solar business.
Wind and solar energy are getting cheaper
Mon, 25 Mar 2019 12:51:18 GMT
The simple laws of economics threaten to doom America's remaining coal power plants.
Would you trust an AI algorithm to diagnose your illness?
Mon, 15 Jul 2019 09:03:45 GMT
We put a lot of trust in our doctors — we listen to their diagnoses, take out their prescriptions, follow their dietary suggestions. Would we do the same for a computer?
Miami's Little Haiti wasn't a target for developers. Until the seas started to rise
Fri, 12 Jul 2019 15:14:00 GMT
America is building another big wall. This one will protect New York
Mon, 15 Jul 2019 03:39:29 GMT
How rich people could help save the planet from the climate crisis
Fri, 12 Jul 2019 09:20:40 GMT
Rich people don't just have bigger bank balances and more lavish lifestyles than the rest of us -- they also have bigger carbon footprints.
Stunning images from NASA's first 60 years
Fri, 01 Mar 2019 07:47:04 GMT
NASA marked its 60th anniversary last year, and will celebrate the 50th anniversary of the moon landing in July.
NASA's impossible fighter jet with inverted wings
Sat, 13 Jul 2019 12:24:11 GMT
There's no airplane quite like the Grumman X-29. Its astonishing forward-swept wings were just one of its many bold innovations.
Is this the world's most beautiful metro?
Fri, 27 Jul 2018 04:01:19 GMT
When the Moscow Metro was first announced in the 1930s, the city's residents were immediately fascinated by how it might look. Station designs were reportedly displayed in shop windows along bustling Tverskaya Street, fueling Muscovites' curiosity toward the new underground network.
The unexpected history of the Sikh turban
Fri, 15 Feb 2019 02:26:44 GMT
Growing up in Southall, West London, where many of Britain's Sikhs settled after moving to the UK, the turban was all around us: at home, in the gurdwara, on the street. It is Sikhs' most identifiable feature.
Melania Trump tree statue gets mixed reviews
Sat, 06 Jul 2019 20:00:25 GMT
Melania Trump has made a surprise reappearance near her Slovenian hometown of Sevnica, emerging from a tree stump in the form of a rustic wood statue.
Clinton offers rare glimpse into her home
Thu, 30 May 2019 12:16:48 GMT
The Clintons may have left a certain Washington address almost 20 years ago, but -- unlike most of their presidential predecessors -- the family has kept a home in the US capital since leaving the White House.
Shark eaten whole in feeding frenzy
Thu, 11 Jul 2019 01:33:37 GMT
Perhaps the old saying is true: You are what you eat.
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No-deal Brexit looms as race for new British PM wraps up
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 07:44:55 -0400
No-deal Brexit looms as race for new British PM wraps upThe battle to be Britain's next prime minister enters its final straight on Wednesday with both candidates hardening their positions on Brexit, putting the future government on a collision course with Brussels. Ex-London Mayor Boris Johnson, the favourite to replace Theresa May, and foreign secretary Jeremy Hunt, are now both referring to Britain's departure with no overall deal in place as a realistic prospect. The business community and many lawmakers fear dire economic consequences from a no-deal Brexit which would lead to immediate trade tariffs for certain sectors including the automotive industry.
Germany introducing mandatory measles vaccination for kids
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 07:24:45 -0400
Germany introducing mandatory measles vaccination for kidsThe German government is proposing a measure to make measles vaccinations mandatory for children and employees of kindergartens and schools. Chancellor Angela Merkel's Cabinet approved the plan Wednesday, noting the number of measles infections has risen significantly in recent years. In the phased-in program beginning in March, parents of school-aged children, starting at kindergarten, will have to provide proof of vaccination.
China issues 17,000 smart watches to pupils to track movements
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 07:08:29 -0400
China issues 17,000 smart watches to pupils to track movementsA local government in southern China has handed out smart watches to nearly 17,000 primary school pupils, capable of pinging their real-time locations and emergency alerts to their parents. The watches, distributed to students in 60 schools, are equipped with chips powered by BeiDou, China’s own version of GPS, according to the Guangzhou Daily, a Chinese state media outlet. GPS is a system developed and owned by the US government. “With this watch, Mom and Dad can know where I am, and I can call and voice message them immediately after class,” one enthusiastic fourth-grader told state media. The smart watch-tracking government program is entirely voluntary and about half of the devices distributed have already come online. Plans are in place to issue another 13,000 smart watches to students, and the authorities will soon begin handing them out to elderly people. User information will be uploaded to a database maintained by China’s ministry of public security and the ministry of industry and information technology, according to state media. Cities in China have been getting creative in finding new ways to monitor students and curb truancy with the latest technologies. In December, more than ten schools in Guizhou and Guangxi provinces began requiring students to wear “intelligent uniforms” embedded with computer chips to track their movements and trigger an alarm if they skip class, according to state media. China sent a satellite of the BeiDou Navigation Satellite System into space in June Credit: Xinhua / Barcroft Media Two chips, sown into the shoulders of school jackets, can sustain around 500 wash cycles and temperatures of 150 degrees Celsius. Facial recognition scanners at school gates match the chips with the correct students, meaning anyone who tries to swap jackets in order to play truant will be caught. Alarms will also sound if a pupil falls asleep in class. Last May, a high school in Hangzhou installed facial recognition technology to check how attentive pupils were in class. Movements of students are watched by three cameras positioned above the blackboard, and can pick up seven different emotions, including neutral, happy, sad, disappointed, angry, scared and surprised. If the technology concludes a student is distracted in class, it will send a notification to the teacher to take action. BeiDou was originally developed by the Chinese military to reduce reliance on the US-owned GPS system, but its positioning accuracy is to within 10 metres while GPS can track down to 30 centimetres. In efforts to speed up adoption of the system, Chinese authorities have ordered taxis, buses and other vehicles to install BeiDou, and many domestic phone brands including Huawei and Xiaomi are now also compatible with the system. There are only a handful of other global satellite navigation systems, including Russia’s Glonass and Europe’s Galileo, which has suffered an outage over the last two weeks. The UK has been involved in developing Galileo, sinking £1.2 billion in the project, but now intends to build its own as part of Brexit fallout.
British-Iranian woman held in Iran moved to psychiatric ward
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:39:05 -0400
British-Iranian woman held in Iran moved to psychiatric wardA British-Iranian woman imprisoned in Iran has been transferred to a hospital mental health facility, her husband said Wednesday. Richard Ratcliffe said in Britain that his wife, Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, has been moved to the mental health ward of Iman Khomeini hospital under the control of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard. Zaghari-Ratcliffe, 40, was arrested in Iran while traveling with the couple's young daughter in April 2016 and has been sentenced to five years in prison after being accused of spying, which she and her family vehemently deny.
Egypt releases transgender woman after 4 months in jail
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:28:04 -0400
Egypt releases transgender woman after 4 months in jailAn Egyptian rights group says authorities have released a transgender woman held for more than four months in connection to a call for protests. El-Kashef was among dozens arrested over calls for demonstrations following a Feb. 27 train crash in Cairo that killed at least 25 people. Prosecutors say they suspect she belongs to an unnamed terrorist group, a reference to the banned Muslim Brotherhood.
UK's Hammond attacks "terrifying" views of Brexiteer Rees-Mogg
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:23:17 -0400
UK's Hammond attacks "terrifying" views of Brexiteer Rees-MoggBritish finance minister Philip Hammond said on Wednesday it was "terrifying" that leading Brexit advocate Jacob Rees-Mogg, who could have a role in the next government, thought Britain could be better off by leaving the EU without an exit deal. Hammond, who does not intend to continue as finance minister when a new prime minister is named next week, was responding to criticism from Rees-Mogg - the latest turn in a long-running row that typifies Brexit divisions in the ruling Conservative Party. Rees-Mogg, who has been linked with a role in government if fellow Brexiteer Boris Johnson becomes prime minister, argues Britain could be better off.
UK Brexit minister Barclay says chances of a 'no deal' EU exit are underpriced
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:18:14 -0400
UK Brexit minister Barclay says chances of a 'no deal' EU exit are underpricedThe chances of Britain leaving the European Union without a deal at the end of October are underpriced, Britain's Brexit minister Stephen Barclay said on Wednesday. Asked about the likelihood of a no-deal Brexit, Barclay pointed to the fact that parliament is only due to sit for a relatively short period of time in September and October and that legislation required to pass a deal would be significant.
The Man With the Real Power in Brazil
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:13:13 -0400
The Man With the Real Power in Brazil(Bloomberg) -- Want to receive this post in your inbox every day? Sign up for the Balance of Power newsletter, and follow Bloomberg Politics on Twitter and Facebook for more.While Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro complains that lawmakers want to make him a ceremonial head of state like the Queen of England, the real power rests with Rodrigo Maia, the speaker of Congress’s lower house.Pale, paunchy, and soft-spoken — with occasional ferocious flashes of temper — Maia sees his mission as defending the democratic institutions that some of Bolsonaro’s more radical supporters favor scrapping, Simone Iglesias and Samy Adghirni report. Bolsonaro’s son Carlos has repeatedly whipped up his massive social media following against him.Maia, 49, showed his authority this month when he united 17 fractious parties to approve a crucial revamp of a social security system that is dragging on Latin America’s biggest economy. After the Chamber of Deputies passed the measure and sent it to the Senate, he wept as supporters gave him a standing ovation.The speaker backs pro-market aspects of the president’s program, but has blocked more inflammatory proposals such as loosening gun-control laws. Without a strong democratic system, he argues, Brazil won't attract essential investment.Attacks on Brazil’s institutions by some in Bolsonaro’s camp don’t help.“They’re a movement, an antidemocratic fringe and this doesn’t pressure me,” Maia says. “But it does worry me.”Global HeadlinesRare rebuke | The Democratic-led U.S. House responded to Donald Trump’s sustained attacks on four female Democratic lawmakers by taking the extraordinary step of rebuking the president for racism. The resolution accused the president of having “legitimized and increased fear and hatred of new Americans and people of color.” It is a serious accusation that sharpens the battle lines going into the 2020 elections.Read about how Republicans objected to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi calling Trump’s comments racist.Making the case | The incoming president of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, said in interview she aims to persuade Trump that Europe and the U.S. still have many common interests. One person hoping she succeeds will be her successor as German defense minister. Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer wants to use the job to revive her chances of becoming chancellor and the last thing she needs is a long-running battle with the White House.Initial penalty | Trump confirmed reluctantly that Turkey won’t be able to buy U.S. F-35 fighter jets because it is taking delivery of a Russian missile-defense system. The U.S. is still weighing economic sanctions, even as Trump inaccurately said that President Recep Tayyip Erdogan was "forced" into buying the S-400 because Obama's administration would not sell him the Patriot system.Sudan deal | The ruling military council and civilian opposition alliance in Sudan signed a political accord today as part of a power-sharing agreement meant to end a crisis that followed the ouster of President Omar al-Bashir in April. A second, constitutional accord is expected to be ratified on Friday that will lead to the formation of an 11-seat sovereign council with executive responsibilities and the holding of elections in three years.Economic cost | Hong Kong's protracted protests might be starting to hurt its economy. The Hong Kong Retail Management Association reported that most of its members saw a single-to-double-digit drop in average sales revenue between June and the first week of July, amid fears the city's political chaos could impact its status as a global financial hub.What to WatchThe signs of summer have arrived in the Chinese resort town of Beidaihe: Umbrellas are out, traffic controls are in place and the regional Communist Party chief has stopped by to check everything's ready for President Xi Jinping's visit. Click here for what to look for at this year's conclave. A clash over digital taxation could overshadow a meeting near Paris of Group of Seven finance chiefs, as France digs in on imposing levies that will hit American tech giants Saudi Arabia says it will allow some businesses to stay open 24 hours a day, news that triggered confusion over whether it was ending rules that require shops to shut for Islam’s five daily prayers.And finally...Former Supreme Court Justice John Paul Stevens died yesterday aged 99. Appointed in 1975 by a Republican president, only to become a leading liberal voice on presidential powers, Stevens retired in 2010 as the second-oldest justice in American history. He frequently spoke for his wing of the court in high-profile dissents, including the 5-4 decision stopping the Florida ballot recounts that might have led to Democrat Al Gore’s election over George W. Bush in 2000. \--With assistance from Karen Leigh, Kathleen Hunter and Ben Sills.To contact the author of this story: Karl Maier in Rome at kmaier2@bloomberg.netTo contact the editor responsible for this story: Rosalind Mathieson at rmathieson3@bloomberg.net, Anthony HalpinFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.
Saudi Arabia intercepts drone launched by Yemeni rebels
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 06:08:58 -0400
Saudi Arabia intercepts drone launched by Yemeni rebelsThe Saudi military says it has intercepted a drone launched at the kingdom's southern border by Iranian-backed rebels in Yemen. Col. Turki al-Maliki, a military spokesman, was quoted in the state-run Saudi Press Agency on Wednesday as saying the drone was launched by the Houthi rebels from Yemen's governorate of Sanaa toward the Saudi city of Jizan.
Trump’s Bungled Iran Gambit Is Helping China Become a Naval Power With Global Reach
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 05:36:06 -0400
Trump’s Bungled Iran Gambit Is Helping China Become a Naval Power With Global ReachPhoto Illustration by Lyne Lucien/The Daily BeastGWADAR, Pakistan—British warships are acting as nervous escorts to British oil tankers in the Persian Gulf, even as Europe tries desperately to find a way out of the escalating crisis with Iran provoked by U.S. President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the nuclear accord last year. But the Chinese role in the background of this escalating crisis has been largely overlooked, and could have enormous strategic consequences. Already, China is positioning itself to act as a policeman protecting its own strategic interests in the Persian Gulf,  the Arabian Sea and the Indian Ocean beyond.Trump and the Persian Gulf Have a Long, Surprising HistoryThe key is the port of Gwadar on Pakistan’s southwest coast about 625 nautical miles east of the Strait of Hormuz, the gateway for about a third of the world’s international oil traffic.  China is spending a huge amount—$60 billion—building what is called the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor (CPEC) to link western China with Gwadar Port through a network of highways, railways and gas pipelines. This, in turn, is part of its grand design known as the “One Belt, One Road” initiative, or OBOR. The U.S. Defense Department, reporting to Congress in May, summed up U.S. concerns about Chinese strategy, which it sees as likely to make countries around the world potentially dependent on their ties to the China’s economy and uncritical of, if not indeed subservient to, its policies. But the Defense Department noted that global presence also heightens China’s global exposure to “international and regional turmoil, terrorism, piracy, and serious natural disasters and epidemics,” which the Chinese People’s Liberation Army is supposed to deal with.Specifically, as the Defense Department noted, “Some OBOR investments could create potential military advantages for China, should China require access to selected foreign ports to pre-position the necessary logistics support to sustain naval deployments in waters as distant as the Indian Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, and Atlantic Ocean to protect its growing interests.”Which brings us back to Gwadar, here in the often troubled province of Balochistan, which borders Iran and Afghanistan. The Chinese already have discovered they’re targets for a shadowy separatist organization calling itself the Balochistan Liberation Organization, which attacked the Chinese consulate in Karachi in November. In May this year the group hit the luxury Pearl Hotel which looks out on Gwadar Harbor. All four attackers and at least one security guard were killed. “Our fighters have carried out this attack on Chinese and other foreign investors,” the group said.Undeterred, China continues to push ahead as the  builder, financier and operator of this strategic port, and Beijing may be much more concerned about Washington’s aggressive policies in the region than it is about the terrorists.Iran's threat to shut the Strait of Hormuz has pushed the U.S. into proposing a maritime coalition to protect shipping lanes in the Indian Ocean Region.  It would act as a kind of regional watchman with eyes on all shipping lanes. But that would also position the coalition as a potential threat to China’s development of strategic assets here.On the other hand, a naval base in Gwadar enables Beijing to monitor American activities very closely, patrolling sea lanes to protect its own interests while monitoring U.S. activities in the Indian Ocean.Pakistan would have a number of incentives to cooperate, including its icy relations with Washington.  Defense cooperation is a major aspect of what Pakistan and China call their "all-weather friendship.”For the record, Beijing has dismissed news reports that it will build a full-fledged naval base at Gwadar. But as the Pentagon pointed out,  in the near term China is more likely to preposition logistical support for a growing Chinese naval presence. An escalation of the U.S.-Iran conflict or volatility in the Gulf could give Beijing the pretext to build a more ambitious naval base at Gwadar for security reasons. It is dependent on imported oil for more than 70 percent of its needs, and much of that comes out of the Gulf. U.S. Must Put a Ban on Google Helping China Develop a Global Digital DictatorshipIf a base is to be built, some analysts believe China’s model for Gwadar might be its installation at Yulin along the southern coast of China’s Hainan Island, a strategic key in Beijing’s efforts to claim control over virtually all of the South China Sea. Yulin can accommodate aircraft carriers, and so-called “caverns” are believed capable of hiding up to 20 nuclear submarines from spy satellites. If a similar base were located at the crown of the Arabian Sea, China’s ability to expand the reach of its navy would increase exponentially.  None of that lies in the immediate future, but it’s clearly the kind of thing the Pentagon is worrying about. As the report to Congress stated bluntly, one of the “overriding strategic objectives” of the Chinese Communist Party is to “secure China’s status as a great power and, ultimately, emerge as the preeminent power in the Indo-Pacific region.”How ironic it would be if the Trump administration’s manufactured crisis with Iran opened the door wide for such a strategic breakthrough by China. With additional reporting by Christopher DickeyRead more at The Daily Beast.Get our top stories in your inbox every day. Sign up now!Daily Beast Membership: Beast Inside goes deeper on the stories that matter to you. Learn more.
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